When is the right time to change your PR job?

Every single person has faced some sort of challenge over the past year, small or big, as we’ve navigated the (hopefully) once-in-a-lifetime event – this global pandemic. And it’s this that makes decisions that may otherwise feel easy to draw a conclusion about feel more monumental than ever.

The last few months have dragged with our freedoms restricted, people have had to weather unchartered territory; intensified work, childcare and housework pressure or lack of space to be able to draw lines in the workplace and relaxation, so it comes as no surprise that it has led, for most, to an increasingly negative mindset about our everyday situation.

Thankfully, there’s brighter days ahead with an end date to this version of life as we know it. So why not use this time to reassess decisions and take the time and steps to consider the impact of your everyday now things have shifted.

It is hard to say goodbye
It’s no secret that being able to cut ties with anything that you’ve grown accustomed to, and loved, is challenging for most, especially if you feel there’s external and internal pressure. In the workplace this is no different. Companies and employees are still trying to strike the best approach for everyone, and everyone wants to get it right. More and more companies are adopting new measures to help support their employees, make sure you are aware of them so you can take these into consideration.

Working in HR for a number of years, the biggest life lesson to embrace is the power of communicating, especially when you are making a potentially huge decision like leaving your job. The age-old expression, a problem shared is a problem halved is true. Don’t rush your decisions especially when it comes to leaving your job. Please confide in someone, and always take time to reflect and consider your options, the earlier you do this the better, don’t wait until you are at breaking point.

Clarify: Give yourself permission and take some time out, when you’re feeling relaxed and have some headspace to think about what you’re feeling, make a note in black and white of the pros and cons of leaving. Speak to someone independent in the first instant to get their perspective, to make sure your views are balanced and fair.

Understand: Second, speak to someone within the organisation who you trust and who can help make any changes that might help influence your decision. If you’ve not spoken up and raised your concerns, you may find this does help to resolve things. Often, businesses are a lot more flexible than they are given credit for, businesses never want to lose great talent, discussing your options may give you what you If not, it may be time to consider your options.

Consider: It’s always worth taking into account how you feel you’ve been treated by your company on a whole, something we use regularly is drop-in sessions for the HR team so that people feel at ease to come and have a chat with someone from the senior team. How has your company responded to mental health issues? Mental Health Champion training is useful for not just senior staff but everyone.

Decide: Despite what you hear, there are always options. Take your time, realise there is no rush, doing things in the right way and ensuring any decision you make is right for you takes time, consideration and patience. It’s good to work out who it is you want to talk to about how you are feeling. HR is here to help, if not them then perhaps your line manager.

Plan: Knee jerk reactions don’t help anyone in the long run, so if after you’ve taken all the above into consideration have a plan and have confidence in it, sometimes a break can solve many a problem and companies are flexible, we’re all in this together.

Written by Ita Waller, HR director of integrated marketing agency group UNLIMITED