Common communication mistakes in the $4.5 trillion wellness sector

The global wellness economy is worth $4.5 trillion and Google searches for wellness products have exploded during lockdown, making it prime time for brands to tell their own wellness stories. This may seem like a new industry, but wellness is a modern word with ancient roots and today covers a wide range of sectors from personal care, beauty, healthy eating and fitness to spa, wellness tourism, corporate wellness and more. Working in the wellness industry for over 16 years, I’ve witnessed some common mistakes when it comes to communications. Here are some examples to avoid.

Not taking it seriously – MP William Wragg in Prime Minister’s questions recently showed contempt for the industry when referring to his local ‘Lush’ beauty salon not being able to open, much to the hilarity of the prime minister who had previously called spas ‘massage parlours’. This resulted in a huge backlash from the industry.

Poor messaging – Consumers are more knowledgeable about self-care than ever before so can clearly see when a brand is trying to wellness wash them! Learn their language and find ways of incorporating this terminology into your messaging. Avoid words such as healing and cure which should be left to the medical industry.

Assumptions – Don’t assume you know enough to give your story the wellness weight it needs. The industry is full of incredible professionals who have spent years training, many of whom have growing profiles and a huge amount of expertise to share. Listen to the experts and use them to give support to your stories.

Being vague – Once upon a time going out with a press release to launch a hotel with a new spa might have sufficed, but today you need to drill down to uncover its unique wellness features. This could be an innovative thermal experience room never experienced before, the largest garden spa with a spectacular view and forest bathing or a team of superstar therapists who can help alleviate the stresses of modern day life.

Bad timing – as with any story, timing can be everything when it comes to making news. There are probably more awareness days relating to wellness than any other sector so it’s worth checking these first. Note that wellness trends can move quickly so monitor public behaviour and anticipate their needs. While digital fitness and spa at home peaked during lockdown, now we’ve moved onto staying healthy in public places and dealing with the psychological fallouts of spending time apart.

Written by Tracey Stapleton, founder of The Spa PR Company


Creative Moment Awards 2020